6 Safety Tips for Your Dog's 4th of July

Between the fireworks, family and friends, grilled hot dogs, and good music, it’s hard not to get excited when the 4th of July is right around the corner. But for some dogs, the 4th of July can be a dangerous, disorienting, or downright scary experience. That’s why we’re here to help you plan ahead!

Whether your dog is a 4th of July newbie or a seasoned pro, here are six helpful tips to keep your dog safe, comfortable, and happy on Independence Day.

1. Keep Your Dog Indoors, If Possible

As much as we love bringing our dogs with us for fun outings and holidays, the combination of big fireworks, large crowds, and loud music might be too much for some dogs to handle.

To spare Fido from all the stimuli, the best and safest option is to keep your dog indoors when the 4th of July celebrations begin. Or, if you’re planning on celebrating with others but don’t want to leave your dog alone, ask a neighbor if they’re willing to puppy-sit while you’re away.

2. Give Them a Calming Supplement

If your dog appears skittish and runs for cover when fireworks are go off, one of the easiest ways to calm their nerves is with a holistic calming supplement.

Not only are calming supplements a great way to soothe stress and tension in crowded spaces, but as we mentioned in a previous article, they can also help dogs with separation anxiety and sleep troubles. Just be sure the product has Melatonin, Hemp, Valerian Root, and L-Theanine to achieve the best results.

3. An ID Tag and a Microchip Are Must-Haves

Some dogs might take this whole Independence Day thing too literal by bolting when the booms of fireworks begin. So, if you decide to bring your dog outside for the festivities, make sure they’re tagged and microchipped beforehand.

At around $50 for the procedure, microchipping is a safe, harmless, and low-cost way to make sure track down your dog if they ever make a run for it. Although most shelters and breeders take care of RFID microchipping for you before adoption, be sure to ask a veterinarian if you’re unsure.

4. Keep Holiday Items Away from Your Pet

We all know that dogs are sometimes too curious for their own good. So, just imagine how curious they’ll act when they see food, grilling utensils, charcoal bags, frilly decorations, and firecrackers lying around!

With so many hazardous items near your dog, it’s crucial to make sure all food, beverages, fireworks, and equipment are stored in hard-to-reach places. So, whether you’re hosting a 4th of July party or bringing your pet to a loved one’s gathering, move anything dangerous that could be within paw’s reach.

5. Don’t Let Them Have Those Table-Scraps

We’re all guilty of sneaking “people-food” to dogs before, so don’t be surprised if your dog tries suckering you and guests for unfinished food with those sad puppy-dog eyes.

As you know, some foods are far from dog-friendly. So, be sure to keep an eye out for your dog’s people-food campaign to make sure your friends and family won’t cave in. We also recommend feeding your dog a hearty meal before 4th of July feasting, since a full stomach may dissuade them from even bothering.

6. Clear Lawn Debris the Next Day

Time flies when we’re having fun, but so does used fireworks, plastic cups, paper plates, and other debris that are leftover from the festivities – especially if your neighbors had outdoor gatherings as well.

Whether it’s ash on the driveway from fireworks, or places where food and alcohol were spilled, use the daylight to clear away anything hazardous your dog could stumble upon. Additionally, be sure to keep filled trash bags away from your dog as well. Even the most disciplined dogs might start digging for 4th of July treasures while your back is turned!

 

We hope these tips will help your dog’s 4th of July go by without a hitch. If you have any comments, tips of your own, or questions about nature-inspired calming supplements, tell us below! You can also reach out to us at (800)-940-1972 or bark@zestypaws.com.

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